[Publication en ligne] “Glass in Architecture from the Pre- to the Post-industrial Era: Production, Use and Conservation” / Sophie Wolf , Laura Hindelang , Francine Giese and Anne Krauter, De Gruyter, 2024

Parution en ligne de : “Glass in Architecture from the Pre- to the Post-industrial Era: Production, Use and Conservation” / Sophie Wolf , Laura Hindelang , Francine Giese and Anne Krauter, De Gruyter, 2024.

Résumé : Glass is one of the most fascinating and versatile building materials in architectural history. The new insights into glass in architecture are the result of research at the intersection of glass production, construction technology and building culture. Coming from a variety of disciplines, the contributions bridge the divide between natural sciences, humanities and the preservation and restoration of cultural heritage. They explore the crucial role of flat glass in shaping architecture, particularly since the 18th century, and discuss the in-situ restoration of historic windows and glass façades and the importance of preserving this fragile heritage. The topics range from the manufacture of sheet glass in pre-industrial times to the possibilities of repair and reusability of insulating glazing.

Accédez au document en ligne : Glass in Architecture from the Pre- to the Post-industrial Era

Contribution membre UMR AUSser

10 ÉMALIT® THE CHALLENGE POSED BY A TEMPERED AND ENAMELLED SHEET GLASS FOR THE GLASS FAÇADE
Catherine Blain (membre IPRAUS/AUSser) and Océane Bailleul
p. 191-208 
https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110793468-011

Abstract:
Émalit is a coloured-glass product that was developed in 1958 by the French company Saint-Gobain, and which has been commercially available ever since (now under the name Émalit évolution).1 It is a tempered glass enamelled on one side, produced in sheets of varying size, mainly used for façade cladding. Following its launch, this new product found multiple applica-tions in France. Experimented with initially as a decorative element, Émalit swiftly attracted the attention of architects. Thus in 1960, Maurice Silvy and Joseph Belmont integrated Émalit into their design for the façade of a prototype ‘industrialized school’, which had been drawn up in collaboration with Jean Prouvé and the SGAF (the latter a consortium that brought together the manufacturers Saint-Gobain and Aluminium Français), employing the ‘glass-panel façade’ principle that combined aluminium joinery, insulating glazing, and Émalit panels. In 1961, this time calling on the architect Jacques Beufé, the SGAF incorporated the same component into a prototype for ‘industrialized housing’. These prototypes, notable for their colourful aesthetic, would give rise to many construction projects. But the profoundest impression made by Émaliton the imagination is its punctuation of the large, glazed façade of one particular major inter-national facility: the south terminal of Orly Airport (1957–61), designed by the architect Henri Vicariot. In addition to these flagship projects, a whole range of Émalit panels—smooth, pol-ished, striated, or even imitation granite (Durlux)—have contributed to the success of various construction programmes, notably in relation to office buildings, one of the most thriving mar-kets at the time.Posing questions as to this product’s future in the built environment, this article also addresses associated heritage issues by exploring the current renovation project at the Musée départemen-tal Arles antique, which was clad by the architect Henri Ciriani with a bluish Émalit (1986–95).


OpenEdition vous propose de citer ce billet de la manière suivante :
Pascal Fort (14 juin 2024). [Publication en ligne] “Glass in Architecture from the Pre- to the Post-industrial Era: Production, Use and Conservation” / Sophie Wolf , Laura Hindelang , Francine Giese and Anne Krauter, De Gruyter, 2024. Carnet de veille UMR AUSser. Consulté le 15 juillet 2024 à l’adresse https://doi.org/10.58079/11tka


Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search